Eminent Lectures
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Eminent Lectures

Gilbert S. Omenn
  • International Cooperation in Proteomics and Informatics
  • 8 Nov 2007
  • Gilbert S. Omenn
  • Proteomics is the large-scale study of proteins, particularly their structures and functions. The term "proteomics" was coined to make an analogy with genomics, the study of genes, and is often considered the next step in the study of biological systems, after genomics. Scientists are very interested in proteomics because it gives a much better understanding of an organism than genomics. Since proteins play a central role in the life of an organism, proteomics is instrumental in discovery of biomarkers, such as markers that indicate a particular disease.

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Lori B. Andrews
  • The Many Faces of Human Cloning
  • 15 Sep 2004
  • Lori B. Andrews
  • Lori Andrews’ Lecture explored the technology of human cloning and the ethical, religious and legal debates it poses. “Where should our genetic map lead to, and whether certain applications of genetics should be forbidden?” is one of the important questions raised by this technology.

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Mahathir Mohamed
  • Cultural Interaction
  • 6 Sep 2004
  • Mahathir Mohamed
  • Former Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamed tackled ways of cultural interaction referring to examples from Andalusia (Muslim Spain), North and South America, and highlighting the Malaysian experience in that regard, being a multi-racial country. He discussed challenges of cultural preservation and interaction in a the globalized world, especially issues related to absolute freedom and moral values.

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Mahathir Mohamed
  • Human Resources Development
  • 5 Sep 2004
  • Mahathir Mohamed
  • “The production abilities of people are probably the same in all societies, but differences of culture and the value system affect their ability to deliver the right kind of work with the same quality of products”, said Mahathir Mohamed. In his lecture, Former Malaysian Prime Minister gave an overview of how Malaysia turned from a poor rice-cultivating country, into one of the most competitive industrial giants in Asia. He contrasted the work ethics of a rural society with the operation of a highly industrialized urban community, adding that the switch from one to the other "required a change in the mind-set of the people as a whole."

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