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2016

Ras El-Soda Temple

 

It is a small Ionic peristyle temple. It is built of limestone with marble columns. The temple is dated to the second century CE and was dedicated to Isis and other Egyptian deities.



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2016

Kom El-Shoqafa

The Roman catacombs of Kom el-Shoqafa, or Mound of shards, were accidentally discovered in 1900, their Graeco-Roman style, often combined with Egyptian elements, is an example of the cultural fusion which occurred in the ancient city of Alexandria.



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2016

Anfushy Necropolis

The Anfushy tombs were discovered in 1901, these limestone rock tombs consist of a group of graves, only five of which are visible today and belong to the Oikos (house) type.



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2016

Kom El-Dikka

In the heart of modern Alexandria lie the remains of a once vibrant and sprawling complex known today as Kom el-Dikka. The ruins of Kom el-Dikka offer visitors a glimpse of an ancient Roman cityscape complete with theater, public baths, houses, and palatial villas.



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2016

The Serapeum of Alexandria

The Serapeum was the sanctuary dedicated to Serapis, the head of the Alexandrian divine triad during the Fraeco-Roman period. In later periods, the Serapeum became known as Amoud el-Sawary and also as Pompey’s Pillar, due to a mistaken identification of Diocletian’s Column, which dominated the site.



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2016

Chatby Necropolis

In the Ancient eastern quarter of Alexandria, overlooking the Mediterranean Sea, lies the Chatby Necropolis. The oldest necropolis in the city, it probably served as a resting place for the deceased since the fourth century BCE. These rock tombs are the oldest example of Alexandrian-style burials.



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2016

Mustapha Kamel Necropolis

The Mustapha Kamel Necropolis constitutes one of the most remarkable examples of Hellenistic funerary architecture in the Mediterranean. It was discovered and excavated in 1933 by Achile Adriani, Director of the Graeco-Roman Museum of Alexandria.



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